Saturday 25th March, 2017

Frequently Asked Questions

What is Philologus?
Can I try the games and activities?
Do I have to pay?
Do you make promises about down-time?
What will happen to my personal details that are collected by Philologus?
What are the technical requirements of the games?
How can I get help with Philologus?
What games will be added next?
Why the name "philologus"?

What is Philologus?

Philologus is an online resource allowing teachers to create games and activities for use in the classroom. It was born out of the need for new classroom activities to engage pupils, and to use technology in the most effective way possible. Every activity can be customised by the creator to ensure it is completely tailored to their requirements. There are many software packages offering similar activities, but these have not always been designed with ease of use as the primary factor, which is something of a serious oversight from the users' point of view. Philologus focuses on the teacher and the pupil in making the users' experience easy, trouble free, and fun from the outset.

Can I try the games and activities?

Yes! There are some demonstration puzzles for each game which you can access freely. If you sign up you can access games that other users have published, but the best way for you to try things out is to start creating your own games which you can do as soon as you have signed up.

Do I have to pay?

No. Philologus is provided free of charge, although we do invite users to make a donation towards the development and running costs of the site.

Do you make promises about down-time?

In short, no. Philologus aims to keep its running costs to a minimum in order to offer the service free of charge, and making that kind of promise would just cost too much. In reality Philologus is very rarely 'down', and the free access will allow you to make your own informed decisions about the reliability and suitability of the service.

What will happen to my personal details that are collected by Philologus?

Philologus will never sell or abuse your personal details in any form. You will only be sent e-mails of specific relevance to Philologus and these will be kept to an absolute minimum. Any other information you provide will be kept confidential, and games that you create will only be accessible to other users if you choose to publish them, or to copy them to another user.

What are the technical requirements of the games?

The games are all designed to be played online. They have been tested with the Microsoft Internet Explorer, Opera, and Firefox browsers and require JavaScript to be enabled, cookies to be allowed, and support for style sheets; this is the default behaviour for the browsers, so unless you have deliberately changed a setting, they should work. Some games run slowly in Firefox, and where possible using MSIE or Opera is preferable, although not obligatory.

Complex game layouts have been optimised for 800x600 and 1024x768 screen resolutions, allowing them to be used successfully with the majority of digital projectors. If, and when, higher screen resolutions become more widespread, support for them will be automatically added.

How can I get help with Philologus?

Philologus is designed to be self-explanatory and simple to use with information provided on pages where necessary. However if you have any unanswered questions, please e-mail support@philologus.co.uk where your question will be answered personally as quickly as possible.

What games will be added next?

The current development plans include many childhood favourites suitable for classroom use such as Flashcards, List Ordering, and Item Pairing amongst others, and larger format quiz show games such as WipeOut. Any particular suggestions or requests are always welcome and should sent by e-mail to webmaster@philologus.co.uk.

Building blocks

Why the name "philologus"?

If you Google for the word 'philologus' you are presented with a variety of web pages ranging from babies' name (it is, apparently, suitable for a girl) to a Christian in Rome to whom St Paul sent his greetings in the Bible. The name was chosen for this site because as a Latin word it is usually translated as scholar and its literal meaning, from its Greek roots, is lover of letters or words.